Coming Up On Radio Health Journal Show 17-30

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Consolidating 911: Where Do We Draw the Line?

911 is literally a lifeline for millions of Americans, but it’s mostly based on old technology depending on land line phones to know where callers are. Expensive next generation technology built for the 75 percent of 911 calls from cell phones has helped push call centers to consolidate. But will it cost lives when a far away call center worker with no local geographic knowledge takes your call?

Healing Children: Not Just Little Adults

Children’s medicine is more specialized than many people think. Pediatric practitioners and hospitals are set up to deal with the different biology of children. An expert explains.

17-29 Segment 1: Sibling Abuse

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Have you ever fought with a sibling? Most of us have at some point, especially as kids. While some experts say sibling rivalry strengthens sibling relationships, others claim this can be harmful for a child’s well-being. In extreme cases, siblings torment their brothers or sisters to the point of psychological or physical abuse. This abuse can lead to psychological disorders throughout a child’s life.

 

Thirty to fifty percent of siblings face abuse in their lifetime. What line can parents determine which is plain sibling rivalry and which is actual abuse? PTSD trainer Nancy Kilgore suffered through fifteen years of severe emotional, physical, and sexual abuse from her own sister. She wrote the book Girl in the Water about her abuse and the psychological effects on her life. Kilgore says parents must not dismiss that it is normal for siblings to torment each other, and suggests parents step in should they see an issue arise.

 

Valparaiso University’s assistant Professor of Psychology Dr. Mandy Morrill-Richards claims that parental attention is a key factor in sibling abuse. Typically, sibling abuse occurs out of the watch of parents, usually when they leave the children home alone. Often times the oldest child takes care of their siblings, and begins to abuse their younger siblings due to the lack of supervision. While parents cannot keep watch over their children 24/7, these experts suggest tackling the problem before it becomes even larger or more harmful for the children. This involves weekly open communication like meetings and paying attention to any warning signs. In order to prevent self-doubt, guilt, shame, and possibly even PTSD, parents need to supervise their children, especially if they begin to harm one another.

Read the entire transcript here. 

Guests:

  • Dr. John Caffaro, Distinguished Professor, Alliant International University
  • Nancy Kilgore, PTSD trainer, abuse survivor and author, Girl in the Water
  • Dr. Mandy Morrill-Richards, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Valparaiso University

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17-29 Segment 2: Teeth and the Struggle for Oral Equality

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Many of us take our smiles for granted. Mary Otto, author of Teeth: The Story of Beauty, Inequality and the Struggle for Oral Health in America, claims that ⅓ of low-income Americans refuse to smile because they are embarrassed by their teeth. Our teeth, whether we realize it or not, have become symbols of status. Have you ever looked at a photo of a celebrity and admired their teeth? Beautiful, white, straight teeth definitely come with a cost, and many underprivileged people find it too expensive.

 

Dr. Cheryl Watson-Lowry, an inner-city Chicago dentist, says that because people do not have proper dental care, they let their dental problems escalate to the point of sending themselves to the Emergency Room. A study in 2012 found that people went to the Emergency Room for dental pain every 15 seconds, costing taxpayers at the time $750 per visit. Watson-Lowry states that Emergency Rooms cannot provide the proper care for dental work. She hopes the Dental Health Care Act of 2017 will generate community dental health coordinators so those who need dental care can get it.

 

Guests:

  • Mary Otto, author, Teeth: The Story of Beauty, Inequality and the Struggle for Oral Health in America
  • Dr. Cheryl Watson-Lowry, inner city Chicago dentist

Links for more information:

Medical Notes 17-29

 

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17-28 Segment 2: The Science of Smell

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The sense of smell evokes powerful memories and makes food taste good, but it also has important functions in interpersonal relations and personal safety. Experts discuss the science behind it.

Read the entire transcript here. 

Guests:

  • Dr. Charles Wysocki, Behavioral Neuroscientist Emeritus, Monell Chemical Senses Center

  • Neil Pasricha, author, The Book of Awesome

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Coming Up On Radio Heath Journal Show 17-29

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Sibling Abuse:

Psychological or physical abuse by siblings is much more common than most people realize. It can leave severe psychological scars. However, parents often downplay it, calling it “normal sibling rivalry.” Experts discuss the extent of the problem, warning signs of abuse, and how parents can act without involving family services officials and endangering the family.

Teeth and the Struggle for Oral Equality:

We often judge people by their smiles. However, dental care and medical care have always been separate in the US, creating a large population that doesn’t receive dental care. These people often end up with extremely poor oral health and make up a surprisingly large proportion of ER visits. Experts discuss.

17-28 Segment 1: Our Obesity Obsession: Does Science Support It?

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The cultural bias against obesity is often justified on health grounds. But recent studies show that people classified in the “overweight” BMI category actually have less mortality than normal weight people. Experts discuss how culture drives our obsession with weight and what science really has to say about it.

Read the entire transcript here:

Guests:

  • Harriet Brown, Associate Professor of Magazine Journalism, Newhouse School of Public Communication, Syracuse University and author, Body of Truth: How Science, History, and Culture Drive Our Obsession With Weight and What We Can Do About It
  • Dr. Carl Lavie, Medical Director of Preventive Cardiology, John Ochsner Heart & Vascular Institute, New Orleans and author, The Obesity Paradox: When Thinner Means Sicker and Heavier Means Healthier

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