Coming up on Radio Health Journal Show 17-51

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Staying Calm in Stressful Times

Meditation and mindfulness could be in even more demand as civility declines and stress increases. An expert explains how it works.

Hiccups

Hiccups are annoying and uncomfortable, and doctors don’t know why we (and most other species) get them. An expert explains what hiccups are and why most home remedies actually work.

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Coming Up On Radio Health Journal Show 17-49

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Human Trafficking: Slavery By Another Name

Millions of vulnerable low-wage workers are exploited and trapped, both in the US and around the world. Experts disscuss why foreigners are especially at risk of being intimidated into forced labor and how they might be rescued.

Pancreatic Cancer

Survival rates for pancreatic cancer remain extremely low due in part to the lack of screening tests for early detection. An advocate and a genetic counselor discuss the state of pancreatic cancer screening and the few alternatives available.

 

17-50 Segment 1: Mental Health Treatment For Children

 

Thirty-five percent of children receiving treatment for mental health issues are treated only by a primary care physician, due in part to a shortage in pediatric mental health care providers as well as a stigma in consulting them. Experts discuss readiness of pediatricians to treat mental illness in children and efforts to be sure they’re prepared.

Guest:

  • Dr. Jeanne Van Cleve, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital for Children
  • Dr. Douglas Tynan, clinical psychologist, American Psychological Association
  • Dr. Scott Benson, child and adolescent psychiatrist, Pensacola, FL

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17-50 Segment 2: Seasonal Affective Disorder and the Holidays

 

Some people, especially those in northern latitudes, may get the blues or worse as fall sets in and days get shorter. They suffer from seasonal affective disorder, a chemical change in the brain caused by decreased exposure to sunlight. Experts discuss causes and remedies.

Guest:

  • Dr. Nicholas Forand, clinical psychologist, The Ohio State University, Wexner Medical Center
  • Jim LaValle, clinical pharmacist and author, Your Blood Never Lies and Cracking the Metabolic Code

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Medical Notes 17-50

 

Medical Notes this week…

Neurologists are warning that Parkinson’s disease could soon become pandemic. A report in the journal JAMA Neurology finds that nearly seven million people have Parkinson’s worldwide, a number that’s likely to more than double by the year 2040. Researchers say that makes Parkinson’s the fastest growing neurological disorder, outpacing even Alzheimer’s disease. Neurological disorders have become the world’s leading cause of disability.

Too much stress is bad for our health, but a little bit turns out to be very good at keeping aging cells robust. A study on animals in the journal Cell Reports shows that when aging cells are mildly stressed, they emit signals that keep quality control machinery in the cell working. This may double the animal’s lifespan by preventing the accumulation of damaged proteins that otherwise would lead to a variety of degenerative diseases.

And finally, yet another use for Botox relieving migraines in children and adolescents. A study presented to the American Society of Anesthesiologists finds that migraines that didn’t respond to traditional treatments did much better after Botox injections. Headaches that previously lasted as long as 24 hours were cut down to seven hours after Botox and on the 1-10 pain scale, headaches that used to come in at an eight were reduced to a five.

And that’s Medical Notes this week.

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Coming Up On Radio Health Journal Show 17-50

rhjlogo

 

Mental Health Treatment For Children

Thirty-five percent of children receiving treatment for mental health issues are treated only by a primary care physician, due in part to a shortage in pediatric mental health care providers as well as a stigma in consulting them. Experts discuss readiness of pediatricians to treat mental illness in children and efforts to be sure they’re prepared.

Seasonal Affective Disorder and the Holidays

Some people, especially those in northern latitudes, may get the blues or worse as fall sets in and days get shorter. They suffer from seasonal affective disorder, a chemical change in the brain caused by decreased exposure to sunlight. Experts discuss causes and remedies.

 

17-49 Segment 1: Human Trafficking: Slavery By Another Name

 

Human trafficking is big business. Bringing in $32 billion a year, it’s second only to drug trafficking in organized crime. In the United States and internationally, forced labor has become a major part of the human trafficking economy.

Catherine Longkumer, Project Manager of the Human Trafficking Initiative, part of the Legal Aid Society of Metropolitan Family Service of Chicago, says any industry that uses low-wage labor has potential for exploitation. Foreigners are especially vulnerable. Longkumer says perpetrators commonly use threats of deportation, withholding of documents and identification, even threats of violence against family members to exert their power. Many women are forced into the commercial sex industry. Lured in by traffickers offering food, jobs, or shelter, they are coerced into exploitative situations.

Longkumer adds that law enforcement without proper training often fails to identify human trafficking cases and ends up arresting victims instead of helping them. “Five years from now after they’re out of the academy, if they haven’t seen a trafficking case, it’s not the first thing that comes to their mind and they don’t always necessarily know the appropriate questions to ask because these aren’t…individuals saying, ‘I’m a victim,’ ” Longkumer stresses.

Many of the exploited women don’t necessarily realize they’re the victim of a crime. Equally problematic, when victims are rescued from trafficking, they are immediately in need of a vast array of social services. Furthermore, these cases are very difficult to prosecute. The laws protecting victims of human trafficking are relatively new, and prosecutors are reluctant to take on cases which rely on proving psychological coercion.

Guests:

  • Melysa Sperber, Director, Alliance to End Slavery and Trafficking
  • Catherine Longkumer, Project Manager, Human Trafficking Initiative, Legal Aid Society of Metropolitan Family Services of Chicago

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17-49 Segment 2: Pancreatic Cancer

 

At sixteen year old, Michael Rofle lost his life to pancreatic cancer just two weeks after he was diagnosed. Now the President and co-founder of the Rolfe Pancreatic Cancer Foundation, Michael’s son, Jim, warns that early detection is really the only shot you have to beat the disease. In contrast to breast, prostate, and colon cancer, which all have five year survival rates over 90%, pancreatic cancer is somewhere around 5-7%. This is because it is rarely detected until it has spread outside the primary site of the cancer, or metastasized.

The hope is that a test will be created to aid in early detection. Currently, pancreatic screening is rare and expensive. It is rarely used unless a patient has an extensive family history of pancreatic cancer.

Jessica Stoll, certified genetic counselor and Assistant Director of the Gastrointestinal Center Risk and Prevention Clinic at the University of Chicago, uses genetic testing with her patients to screen for genetic mutations. Certain mutations can indicate a predisposition to pancreatic cancer. Although, the efficacy of these tests are still be debated.

Jim Rofle explains research into a pancreatic cancer screening test relies primarily on private donations. Government funding is hard to come by. “Their argument is show me your making progress and I’ll fund you. Well, I can’t show you progress unless I have funding, so it’s really backwards,” concludes Rofle.

Guests:

  • Jim Rolfe, President and co-founder, Rolfe Pancreatic Cancer Foundation
  • Jessica Stoll, certified genetic counselor and Assistant Director, Gastrointestinal Center Risk and Prevention Clinic, University of Chicago Medicine

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