Coming up on Radio Health Journal Show 18-03

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When Should Kids Get a Phone?

Smartphones have become ubiquitous among those in their teens and older, but there is no consensus on when children should first get a phone. Experts discuss dangers and cautions, and how parents can decide when the time is right for their kids to “get connected.”

Silent Reflux

Millions of people who think they have allergies, asthma, and sinus problems may actually have “silent reflux” which can travel up the esophagus all the way to the throat and head. An expert discusses telltale symptoms and the dietary triggers that can cause the disorder.

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18-03 Segment 1: When Should Kids Get a Phone?

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Smartphones have become ubiquitous among those in their teens and older, but there is no consensus on when children should first get a phone. Experts discuss dangers and cautions, and how parents can decide when the time is right for their kids to “get connected.”

Guests:

  • Dr. Yalda Uhls, Assistant Professor of Psychology, UCLA and author, Media Moms and Digital Dads
  • Dr. Richard Freed, child and adolescent psychologist and author, Wired Child: Reclaiming Childhood in a Digital Age
  • Brooke Shannon, founder, Wait Until 8th
  • Dr. Scott Campbell, Professor of Telecommunications, University of Michigan

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18-03 Segment 2: Silent Reflux

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Millions of people who think they have allergies, asthma, and sinus problems may actually have “silent reflux” which can travel up the esophagus all the way to the throat and head. An expert discusses telltale symptoms and the dietary triggers that can cause the disorder.

Guest:

  • Dr. Jamie Koufman, Director, Voice Institute of New York, Professor of Clinical Otolaryngology, New York Medical College and author, The Chronic Cough Enigma.

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Medical Notes 18-03

 

Medical Notes this week…

The blood thinner warfarin is prescribed to as many as 10 percent of people in the western world, and a new study shows they’re getting benefits beyond what’s expected. The study in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine shows that warfarin helps protect people from cancer. Researchers say people taking warfarin have a 16 percent reduced risk of cancer overall including a 31 percent reduced risk of prostate cancer and a 20 percent reduced risk of lung cancer.

Vegetables are good for kids and a new study shows fish are especially good for them, too. The study in the journal Scientific Reports finds that kids who eat fish at least once a week sleep better and have IQ scores that are four points higher, on average, than those who eat fish less often. Researchers say fish should be introduced to children by about age two.

And finally, before too long, odds are your doctor is more likely to be a woman than a man. This fall for the first time, more women were enrolled in US medical schools than men. Overall applicants to medical school have increased by more than 50 percent since 2002 and the number of women entering medical school has risen by nearly 10 percent since 2015.

And that’s Medical Notes this week.

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18-02 Segment 1: Violence Against Healthcare Workers

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Healthcare workers are about four times more likely than other workers to be attacked on the job, usually by patients or family members, and most often in the emergency department. Experts discuss how and why attacks occur and how hospitals and health care workers can do a better job preventing them.

Guest:

  • Lisa Wolf, Director, Institute for Emergency Nursing Research, Emergency Nurses Association
  • Dr. Christopher Michos, Connecticut emergency medicine physician
  • Dr. Ronald Wyatt, Medical Director, Division of Healthcare Improvement, The Joint Commission

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Medical Notes 18-02

 

Medical Notes this week…

As much as 10 percent of the population have restless leg syndrome, a nervous system disorder creating an irresistible urge to move the legs, often during sleep. It also creates an increased risk of heart disease death, according to a new study in the journal Neurology. The study is perhaps the first to weed out other heart disease risk factors common in people with RLS, such as high blood pressure. Researchers conclude that restless leg syndrome alone increases heart disease death risk in women by 43 percent.

When you’re sick with the flu or another upper respiratory infection, it pays to know if a virus or bacteria is responsible. For one thing, viruses don’t respond to antibiotics. now there’s an experimental test that can quickly and easily tell the difference. Scientists writing in the Journal of Infectious Diseases say the test could be performed with a nasal swab and could be available in one to five years.

And finally, most cases of bad breath are linked to bacteria growing in the mouth but around three percent of people have chronic bad breath for no apparent reason. It turns out, it’s their genes, according to a study in the journal Nature Genetics. Researchers say these people have a mutation in a gene that normally enables the body to break down smelly sulfur compounds in the blood. But while scientists now know why those people have halitosis there’s nothing yet they can do about it.

And that’s Medical Notes this week.

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