17-09 Segment 1: Can Primary Care Doctors End the Opioid Epidemic

47867389 - depressed girl taking a lot of drugs

 

Eye transplants have long been attempted unsuccessfully. Doctors are taking what they’ve learned in hand transplants, especially in nerve regeneration, and applying it to eye transplant development. Experts discuss what need to be accomplished to make transplants a reality.

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17-09 Segment 2: Eye Transplants: A Future Reality

50324446 - woman sitting in her office with her eyes covered

 

Eye transplants have long been attempted unsuccessfully. Doctors are taking what they’ve learned in hand transplants, especially in nerve regeneration, and applying it to eye transplant development. Experts discuss what need to be accomplished to make transplants a reality.

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Click here for guest information and the transcript

Medical Notes 17-09

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Medical Notes this week…

            Women who’ve suffered a miscarriage and are trying to get pregnant again might want to think about taking a daily baby aspirin. A study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism tested women who had lost a previous pregnancy and scored high for inflammation in the body. Researchers found that those who took a daily low dose aspirin were 31 percent more likely to become pregnant than women who took a placebo and 35 percent more likely to carry the baby to term. However, researchers say it’s too early to recommend aspirin to prevent pregnancy loss. 

            Statistics show that obese girls don’t do as well in school as their thinner counterparts. But a new study in the journal Sociology of Education finds that at least part of the difference may be due to discrimination on the part of their teachers. Researchers say even when they score the same on ability tests, obese white girls receive worse grades than their thinner peers.

            And finally here’s one more thing to put on the list of things to never eat—snow. And it doesn’t matter what color the snow is. A study in the journal Environmental Science, Processes and Impacts finds that snow is remarkably efficient at absorbing particulate air pollution that you find in car exhaust. It’s like a sponge. So catching snowflakes with your tongue may not be as pure as we thought.

And that’s Medical Notes this week.

17-08 Segment 1: Antibiotics and Farm Animals

24200841 - tablets, pills and capsules, that shape a cow

 

Antibiotic resistance may mean some infections are untreatable in the future. To combat this bacterial evolution, new federal rules went into effect on January 1 that restrict use of antibiotics in food animals, where the majority of US antibiotics are consumed. Critics worry the rules don’t go far enough. Experts on both sides of the issue discuss.

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17-08 Segment 2: The Decrease in Hearing Loss

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A major new study shows hearing loss is decreasing in the US. This has surprised some experts who’ve feared greater use of ear buds would lead to greater hearing loss in young people. Experts discuss why hearing loss is declining and caution against complacency.

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17-07 Segment 1: Peanut Allergies and Kids: Changing the Rules

Overhead view of peanut butter on bread with red crayon warning about peanut allergies

 

Peanut allergies in children have skyrocketed to the point that many schools ban foods containing them. Now studies show previous advice is wrong. Rather than keeping kids away from peanuts to protect them, parents should give most infants peanuts from an early age. An allergy expert who is co-author of new guidelines explains.

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17-07 Segment 2: Music for the Dying and Grieving

Woman's hands playing harp

 

Music thanatology is a specialized practice of playing harp music for the dying. A practitioner of the art explains how there is also science to it as well, and a woman whose family has used it describes her experience.

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