17-39 Segment 1: Enlisting Men Against Sexual Assault

 

Colleges are required by Federal law to present anti-sexual assault training to new students, but rather than instilling “no means no,” some experts think we need to do much more to enlist men to help prevent sexual assault. Experts discuss how it can be done by making men allies, rather than regarding them as potential perpetrators, and through bystander training.

Guest:

  • Dr. John Foubert, Professor of Higher Education and Student Affairs, Oklahoma State University, National President, One in Four, and author of 7 books on preventing sexual assault
  • Ashley Warner, psychoanalyst and author, The Year After: A Memoir
  • Dorothy Edwards, ExecutiveDirector, Green Dot, Etc.

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17-39 Segment 2: Teenage Boys: They’re Not Lazy

 

Teenage boys are often labeled as lazy by parents who see that their homework isn’t done and their attitude is one of disinterest. An expert psychologist explains the inner workings of teen boys and how parents can bring out the best in them.

Guest:

  • Dr. Adam Price, author, He’s Not Lazy: Empowering Your Son to Believe in Himself

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Medical Notes 17-39

 

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Coming Up On Radio Health Journal Show 17-39

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Enlisting Men Against Sexual Assault

Colleges are required by Federal law to present anti-sexual assault training to new students, but rather than instilling “no means no,” some experts think we need to do much more to enlist men to help prevent sexual assault. Experts discuss how it can be done by making men allies, rather than regarding them as potential perpetrators, and through bystander training.

Teenage Boys: They’re Not Lazy

Teenage boys are often labeled as lazy by parents who see that their homework isn’t done and their attitude is one of disinterest. An expert psychologist explains the inner workings of teen boys and how parents can bring out the best in them.

17-38 Segment 1: Cutting Nicotine in Cigarettes

 

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In the last fifty years, the number of people who smoke has gone down tremendously, but smoking accounts for one in every five deaths in America. The FDA wants to lower this by mandating a cut in the amount of nicotine in cigarettes. But will this merely encourage smokers to find alternate sources of nicotine?

According to Dr. Eric Donny, if an eighty-five percent reduction of nicotine happens in cigarettes, w will see fewer smokers smoking, and fewer kids getting addicted. Dr. Neal Benowitz says that the plan to lower nicotine in cigarettes might lead some to find a “healthier” alternative like e-cigarettes. Dr. Joshua Sharfstein says that e-cigarettes have been in the middle of a great debate, with some asking whether they are a great tool to quit smoking or a gateway substance for kids to try real cigarettes. The reduction might push people to cleaner forms of nicotine consumption, perhaps even quitting smoking.

Dr. Stanton Glantz, says that this reduction is not good for the future because it pushes back regulation of e-cigarettes. Dr. Glantz believes the FDA is overselling the reduction in cigarettes and giving e-cigarettes a pass on nicotine regulation. Some also think that this would create a black market of full-strength cigarettes. Dr. Glantz does think this is a step in the right direction, even though it does not solve the problem.

America is not the only country that is considering this. Dr. Benowitz says that Canada and New Zealand have been talking about a reduction too. Any one country starting this could create a domino effect on the whole world, leading not just to a healthier country, but a healthier world.

Guest:

  • Dr. Eric Donny, Director, Center for Evaluation of Nicotine and Cigarettes, University of Pittsburgh
  • Dr. Neal Benowitz, Professor of Medicine and Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences and Chief, Division of Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco
  • Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, Professor of the Practice, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and former FDA Deputy Commissioner
  • Dr. Stanton Glantz, Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco and Director, Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education.

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17-38 Segment 2: Do Cardiologists Know Nutrition?

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If medical experts aren’t sure which foods are healthy, how do we decide what to eat? Dr. Charles Katzenberg, a cardiologist at the Sarver Heart Center, says he has discussions about heart healthy food every day with his patients. There is not a national consensus on heart healthy food. This means that different people will give different answers, and no one seems to know what to do. Most cardiologists agree that a good diet will help a person. While the same cardiologists admit to having minimal or no training at all on nutrition in medical school or at their residencies.

Dr. Stephen Devries of the Gaples Institute says while some nutritional knowledge is common sense, other information needs to be taught. If medical professionals aren’t properly trained, they won’t be able to suggest effective interventions. Why is nutrition not taught to a cardiologist? According to Dr. Katzenberg, nutrition isn’t taught to cardiologists, because their training programs prioritize other information.. Both experts agree that the issue starts with the system not putting enough emphasis on preventative measures. The key to solving this problem is for medical professionals to work together with other specialists, like nutritionists, who might have relevant training that would benefit the patient.

Guest:

  • Dr. Charles Katzenberg, University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center
  • Dr. Stephen Devries, Executive Director, Gaples Institute for Integrative Cardiology

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Medical Notes 17-38

 

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