Coming Up On Radio Health Journal Show 18-05

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Adult Bullies–More Common Than We Think

Some bullies never grow up, and just keep on bullying. Experts describe where and how it most often occurs, what workplace bullies are seeking, who they target, why it continues, and what needs to happen to stop it.

Fiber and the Gut

Scientists are discovering why dietary fiber is so good for us—it feeds beneficial bacteria living in our intestines. Experts discuss how far fiber can go to keep us healthy, and what happens when we ignore fiber in the diet.

18-04 Segment 1: Anxiety and Depression–Not a Chemical Imbalance?

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For the last several decades, doctors have believed many mental illnesses were the result of chemical imbalances in the brain. However, a journalist’s investigation shows that lost human connection, dissatisfaction, and loneliness are behind many cases of depression and anxiety. He explains.

Guests:

  • Johann Hari, author, Lost Connections: Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression—and the Unexpected Solutions

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18-04 Segment 2: TBI’s and Personality Change

 

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Traumatic brain injuries, even mild ones, may product cognitive and personality changes months later, when that “bump on the head” has been forgotten. An expert explains these injuries and how to prevent some of the consequences.

Guests:

  • Dr. Sandeep Vaishnavi, neuroscientist, Duke University Medical Center; Director, Neuropsychiatric Clinic, Carolina Partners; co-author, The Traumatized Brain: A Family Guide to Understanding Mood, Memory, and Behavior After Brain Injury

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Medical Notes 18-04

 

Medical Notes this week…

This flu season is officially “moderately severe,” according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and it’s likely to get worse. It’s a result of this year’s predominant flu strain—an H2N3 virus that’s much stronger than the virus that dominated last year. Vaccines are also less effective against H2N3 viruses. Some experts estimate that this year’s vaccine is about 30 percent effective at best. That’s still markedly better than the vaccine did in Australia during winter there six months ago when officials said it was only 10 percent effective.

If you want to cut down on sugar and carbs get more sleep. A study in the “The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition” shows that when people increase their sleep time they don’t have as much of a sweet tooth. A group of study subjects received advice on how to sleep better and increased their sleep time by as much as 90 minutes a night. They ended up making better nutritional choices–cutting down the sugar in their diets by as much as 10 grams a day and also ate fewer carbs.

And finally, to increase strength and power in your workout, swear out loud. A study in the “Journal of Psychology of Sports and Exercise” finds that cursing increases power while riding a stationary bike by nearly five percent and increases hand grip strength by more than eight percent. Researchers can only speculate why it occurs, but they know that swearing is handled by brain regions that don’t normally process language.

And that’s Medical Notes this week.

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Coming up on Radio Health Journal Show 18-04

rhjlogo

 

Anxiety and Depression – Not a Brain Chemical Imbalance?

For the last several decades, doctors have believed many mental illnesses were the result of chemical imbalances in the brain. However, a journalist’s investigation shows that lost human connection, dissatisfaction, and loneliness are behind many cases of depression and anxiety. He explains.

TBI’s and Personality Change

Traumatic brain injuries, even mild ones, may product cognitive and personality changes months later, when that “bump on the head” has been forgotten. An expert explains these injuries and how to prevent some of the consequences.

18-03 Segment 1: When Should Kids Get a Phone?

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Smartphones have become ubiquitous among those in their teens and older, but there is no consensus on when children should first get a phone. Experts discuss dangers and cautions, and how parents can decide when the time is right for their kids to “get connected.”

Guests:

  • Dr. Yalda Uhls, Assistant Professor of Psychology, UCLA and author, Media Moms and Digital Dads
  • Dr. Richard Freed, child and adolescent psychologist and author, Wired Child: Reclaiming Childhood in a Digital Age
  • Brooke Shannon, founder, Wait Until 8th
  • Dr. Scott Campbell, Professor of Telecommunications, University of Michigan

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18-03 Segment 2: Silent Reflux

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Millions of people who think they have allergies, asthma, and sinus problems may actually have “silent reflux” which can travel up the esophagus all the way to the throat and head. An expert discusses telltale symptoms and the dietary triggers that can cause the disorder.

Guest:

  • Dr. Jamie Koufman, Director, Voice Institute of New York, Professor of Clinical Otolaryngology, New York Medical College and author, The Chronic Cough Enigma.

Links for more information:

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