Long-Suffering Covid Survivors

Long-Suffering Covid Survivors

While most people who contract COVID-19 survive, those who suffer often-changing symptoms for months on end can only wonder when they’ll get well. A survey of members of a long-haul survivors support group find that many who don’t have “textbook” symptoms suffer poor medical care and discrimination as a result. Two women who operate the support group discuss the issues.

Medical Notes: Week of June 28, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of June 28, 2020 including: Researchers have been looking for an already existing drug to quickly take on COVID-19, and apparently, now they’ve found one. Meanwhile, the Food and Drug Administration has closed the door on using the malaria treatment Hydroxychloroquine (hy-drox-ee-klor-oh-quin) to treat COVID-19. Then, social isolation has been a lifesaver the last few months, but if it goes on too long, isolation can lead to shorter lifespans. And finally, when employees start going back to the workplace in large numbers you can expect disastrous traffic on the roads.

Medical Notes: Week of June 21, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of June 21, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of June 21, 2020 including: A study finds a much lower death rate among coronavirus patients placed on a ventilator. Then, everyone’s wiping down surfaces with disinfectant these days…but they may become contaminated again within seconds. Then, a new study shows that one reason older men have a higher risk for COVID-19 is because they’re not worried about it. And finally, if you’re counting on your child to grow out of being a picky eater…it may never happen.

Protests Amid The Pandemic

Protests Amid The Pandemic

With thousands of people demonstrating in the streets after the death of George Floyd, health experts are concerned that the crowds, shouting, and lack of masks may contribute to a spike in COVID-19 cases. However, with many locations also “opening up,” they say a spike is inevitable, to be made worse by protests, but teasing out what’s responsible becomes more difficult. Experts discuss.

Misunderstanding Stuttering

Misunderstanding Stuttering

Stuttering is an extremely misunderstood disability. Many stutterers go to great lengths to avoid the words or phrases that trip them up, and are often successful in keeping their disability hidden. Yet then it may be mistaken for other problems. Experts explain, using former Vice President Joe Biden as an example.

Medical Notes: Week of June 14, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of June 14, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of June 14, 2020 including: People who recover from a coronavirus infection often still have a long way to go to recover their mental health. Then, a study that shows sick leave is a good way to slow the spread of diseases like COVID-19. Then, doing good for other people is contagious. And finally, if you’re feeling stressed and anxious about the pandemic… You can bet your dog or cat is feeling it just as much.

Genetic Testing And Life Insurance

Genetic Testing And Life Insurance

It’s illegal for health insurers to use genetic testing to discriminate against policyholders. However, life insurers can and do discriminate on that basis if the test is in your medical file. Private testing lets patients know their risk for many diseases without landing in health files. Advocates want to make it illegal for life insurers to also discriminate on this basis, but it may end up with higher costs for everyone. Experts explain.

Medical Notes: Week of June 7, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of June 7, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of June 7, 2020 including: Researchers are working on an app with a sensor to test for COVID-19 using only a drop of saliva. Then, life was more stressful than it was 25 years ago… and for middle aged people, it’s much more stressful. Plus, A study shows that emergency room visits for children for mental health disorders has increased 60 percent of the last 10 years. And finally, a study shows that homeschooled adolescents have significantly lower abdominal strength and endurance than public school kids even though their BMI’s were the same.

Covid And Choirs

Covid And Choirs

Scientists have discovered that singing is an exceptionally effective way to spread viruses through the aerosolized particles it expels, which may travel much farther than the six foot safety zone many people follow. This means choruses and choirs may not get back to “normal” after the COVI-19 pandemic until much later than most activities, and only with rapid, effective testing or a vaccine. Experts explain.

Medical Notes: Week of May 31, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of May 31, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of May 31, 2020 including: A newly developed smartphone app is remarkably effective at predicting if a person is infected with COVID-19. Then biomarkers for A-L-S or Lou Gehrig’s disease can be found in a person’s teeth in the first decade of life. Then, a study shows that changing the way physical therapy is done can improve strength by an additional 30 percent. And finally, The labels on drinks for kids don’t help adults figure out which ones are real fruit juice and which are sugary, artificially flavored imitations.