17-23 Segment 1: The Health Effects of Loneliness

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Loneliness affects far more than our mental health. Studies are now showing that loneliness and social isolation also have profound effects on our physical health, and increase the risk of death substantially.

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Coming Up On Radio Health Journal Show 17-23

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The Health Effects of Loneliness: Loneliness affects far more than our mental health. Studies are now showing that loneliness and social isolation also have profound effects on our physical health, and increase the risk of death substantially.

Rescuing Runaways: More than two million youth may run away from home each year. More than 100,000 of them are forced into the sex trade each year to survive. One young woman who overcame such a life describes how she beat the odds and what runaways need to have a chance to succeed.

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17-12 Segment 2: Crippling Anxiety

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Anxiety is normal, but too much can be crippling. An author and anxiety sufferer discusses the nature of crippling anxiety and what people can do about it.

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Medical Notes 17-12

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Medical Notes this week…

People who’ve gone to the hospital for treatment of a mental health disorder have an increased risk of stroke for months afterward. A study presented to the International Stroke Conference in Houston shows that people going to the hospital for psychiatric disorders like depression, anxiety and PTSD have triple the risk of a stroke in the next month and double the risk for the next year or more. Scientists speculate that mental illness may provoke the body’s “fight or flight” mechanism which can raise blood pressure and stroke risk.

Early risers may be healthier than people who sleep in. A study in the journal Obesity shows that early birds tend to eat more balanced diets than night owls. They also eat earlier in the day, which helps with weight loss and lowers the risk of diabetes and heart disease.

And finally, many Americans are working from home at least part of the time and a new poll shows we like it that way. However, a little bit of office camaraderie is a good thing. The Gallup survey finds that 43 percent of employees work remotely at least part of the time and that the most engaged workers are those who spend three to four days a week working from home. People who work in the office all the time or at home all the time are the least engaged employees.

And that’s Medical Notes this week.

16-46 Segment 2: Emotional Support Animals

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A woman who suffered severe abuse as a child describes the mental health benefits of owning a dog, and an expert on the Americans with Disabilities Act discusses requirements for emotional support animals.

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16-42 Segment 2: Brain Injury and Homelessness

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Research is showing that a remarkably high proportion of homeless men have suffered a traumatic brain injury in the past, raising the possibility that TBIs may cause behaviors directly leading to homelessness. Experts discuss their research.

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16-38 Segment 2: Homesickness

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Synopsis: What we now call “homesickness” used to be a medical diagnosis called “nostalgia,” and it was considered life-threatening. Today many people consider homesickness to be a childish emotion, but an expert says it’s nothing to be ashamed of. We all suffer from it sometime and need to know how to cope.

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