Medical Notes 17-12

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Medical Notes this week…

People who’ve gone to the hospital for treatment of a mental health disorder have an increased risk of stroke for months afterward. A study presented to the International Stroke Conference in Houston shows that people going to the hospital for psychiatric disorders like depression, anxiety and PTSD have triple the risk of a stroke in the next month and double the risk for the next year or more. Scientists speculate that mental illness may provoke the body’s “fight or flight” mechanism which can raise blood pressure and stroke risk.

Early risers may be healthier than people who sleep in. A study in the journal Obesity shows that early birds tend to eat more balanced diets than night owls. They also eat earlier in the day, which helps with weight loss and lowers the risk of diabetes and heart disease.

And finally, many Americans are working from home at least part of the time and a new poll shows we like it that way. However, a little bit of office camaraderie is a good thing. The Gallup survey finds that 43 percent of employees work remotely at least part of the time and that the most engaged workers are those who spend three to four days a week working from home. People who work in the office all the time or at home all the time are the least engaged employees.

And that’s Medical Notes this week more in a moment.

Medical Notes 17-09

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Medical Notes this week…

            Women who’ve suffered a miscarriage and are trying to get pregnant again might want to think about taking a daily baby aspirin. A study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism tested women who had lost a previous pregnancy and scored high for inflammation in the body. Researchers found that those who took a daily low dose aspirin were 31 percent more likely to become pregnant than women who took a placebo and 35 percent more likely to carry the baby to term. However, researchers say it’s too early to recommend aspirin to prevent pregnancy loss. 

            Statistics show that obese girls don’t do as well in school as their thinner counterparts. But a new study in the journal Sociology of Education finds that at least part of the difference may be due to discrimination on the part of their teachers. Researchers say even when they score the same on ability tests, obese white girls receive worse grades than their thinner peers.

            And finally here’s one more thing to put on the list of things to never eat—snow. And it doesn’t matter what color the snow is. A study in the journal Environmental Science, Processes and Impacts finds that snow is remarkably efficient at absorbing particulate air pollution that you find in car exhaust. It’s like a sponge. So catching snowflakes with your tongue may not be as pure as we thought.

And that’s Medical Notes this week.

16-34 Segment 1: Doctors’ Obesity Bias

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Synopsis: Studies show that medical professionals are as biased as the rest of us against people who are overweight, resulting in lectures, misdiagnoses, and patients who start avoiding the doctor Experts explain the problem, results, and what might be done about it.

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16-30 Segment 2: The Salt Bomb

36241572 - spilled salt with salt shaker on wooden background

 

Most Americans consume far too much salt even if they add none to their foods. Experts discuss why salt is such a health problem and what the federal government is doing to push food processors toward reducing salt content in our diets.

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15-14 Story 1: Food Addiction

 

Synopsis: Scientists are learning that some people can be physically addicted to certain kinds of foods, especially highly-processed foods, and suffer withdrawl when they can’t have them. Experts explain the brain chemistry of food addiction, how it is virtually identical to the chemistry of drug addiction and alcoholism, and what it means for the nation’s fight against obesity.

Host: Reed Pence. Guests: Dr. Ashley Gearhardt, Assistant Professor of Psychology, University of Michigan; Dr. Vera Tarman, Medical Director, Renascent Addiction Treatment Center, Toronto, and author, Food Junkies: The Truth About Food Addiction

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Click here for the transcript.

15-07 Story 2: Mindless Eating

 

Synopsis: People eat for reasons other than satisfying hunger, and those reasons play a great role in whether we eat too much or not. Experts discuss the role of the environment in our appetites and how we may use it to stay slim.

Host: Nancy Benson. Guests: Dr. Brian Wansink, Director, Cornell University Food and Brand Lab and author, Slim By Design: Mindless Eating Solutions for Everyday Life; Dr. Barbara Rolls, Professor of Nutritional Sciences, Penn State University and author, The Ultimate Volumetrics Diet: Smart, Simple, Science-Based Strategies for Losing Weight and Keeping It Off

Click here for the transcript.