18-06 Segment 1: Speaking Out on Sexual Harassment

 

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Silence is no longer an answer. With movements like “Me Too” and “Times Up” surfacing all over social media and popular television, many women are beginning to take a stand against sexual harassment. Dr. Ashton Lofgreen, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Rush University, explains that in the past, there has been a perpetuated silence that discouraged women from speaking up, but now, people are recognizing that they are not alone in their experiences with sexual harassment. While many more women are opening up, there is still a lot of confusion behind what exactly constitutes sexual harassment.

So, how does one know if they have experienced sexual harassment? Dr. Cynthia Eller, Professor of Religion at Claremont Graduate University and author of The Myth of Matriarchal Prehistory: Why an Invented Past Won’t Give Women a Future, thinks that there are some general rules to follow that can help one address whether an action is sexual harassment. Besides understanding specific behaviors, Dr. Emily Grijalva, Assistant Professor of Organization and Human Resources at University of Buffalo, says that there is also a type of person to look out for: a narcissist. In a study done by Dr. Grijalva and her male cohorts, they found that there is a positive connection between narcissism and sexual harassment. While these are a few ways to identify behaviors or traits often associated with sexual harassment, there are other ways too.

It is possible to measure the chances that someone will commit an act of sexual harassment. Dr. John Pryor, Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Psychology at Illinois State University, states that there is a test that measures the willingness that an individual may have to behave in a sexually coercive or exploitative manner, to make gestures that are categorized as unwanted sexual attention, or participate in gender harassment. Despite the fact that these behaviors can be measured, issues of sexual harassment often slide under the radar, many times due to non-disclosure agreements and arbitration clauses that do not permit people to pursue cases within a court, according to Dr. Grijalva.

With the increase in which sexual harassment claims are being made, many people wonder about the possibility of these efforts going awry. But Dr. Lofgreen believes that these claims are fear-based and possibly another way of reinforcing the status quo that it’s better to not talk about these cases of sexual harassment. Similarly, Dr. Eller thinks that as long as a witch hunt is avoided, many people associated with these evolving movements will only benefit from coming forward.

Guests:

  • Dr. Ashton Lofgreen, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Rush University
  • Dr. Cynthia Eller, Professor of Religion at Claremont Graduate University add author of The Myth of Matriarchal Prehistory: Why an Invented Past Won’t Give Women a Future
  • Dr. Emily Grijalva, Assistant Professor of Organization and Human Resources at University of Buffalo
  • Dr. John Pryor, Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Psychology at Illinois State University

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17-39 Segment 1: Enlisting Men Against Sexual Assault

 

How do we end sexual violence? The answer may be that we have to change the culture we are living in to make sexual violence everyone’s problem.

Most college students have already taken their mandatory sexual assault prevention training and education course this year, but will it do anything to stop sexual violence? The facts are sobering: 15-20% of college women still report unwanted sexual interactions and the number of rapes has not decreased since the 1980’s.

Dr. John Foubert, National President of One in Four, and author of seven books on preventing sexual assault, says that college is way too late to start addressing the attitudes that create an environment for sexual violence. High schools need to educate their students on preventing sexual violence. Ashley Warner, author of The Year After: A Memoir, says that education should start teaching students about consent, and what “no” means, in kindergarten.

Another barrier for preventing sexual assault is that it is framed as a women’s problem. Most education focuses on how women can protect themselves from sexual violence. Dorothy Edwards, Executive Director, Green Dot, Etc., believes that men can be women’s greatest ally in stopping the sexual violence because the majority of men do not commit sexual violence.

The bystander in a situation has more power than they think. Dr. Foubert says that a man’s friends have a great influence on him. Edwards reminds us that many men are too shy or intimidated to stop sexual violence. Which makes the need for a shift from saying nothing to stepping in. Edwards says that many organizations have ignored the barriers that society has placed to prevent bystanders from getting involved in these situations. Education should address how to remove the barriers or give bystanders the tools to overcome them.

Guest:

  • Dr. John Foubert, Professor of Higher Education and Student Affairs, Oklahoma State University, National President, One in Four, and author of 7 books on preventing sexual assault
  • Ashley Warner, psychoanalyst and author, The Year After: A Memoir
  • Dorothy Edwards, ExecutiveDirector, Green Dot, Etc.

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Coming Up On Radio Health Journal Show 17-39

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Enlisting Men Against Sexual Assault

Colleges are required by Federal law to present anti-sexual assault training to new students, but rather than instilling “no means no,” some experts think we need to do much more to enlist men to help prevent sexual assault. Experts discuss how it can be done by making men allies, rather than regarding them as potential perpetrators, and through bystander training.

Teenage Boys: They’re Not Lazy

Teenage boys are often labeled as lazy by parents who see that their homework isn’t done and their attitude is one of disinterest. An expert psychologist explains the inner workings of teen boys and how parents can bring out the best in them.

15-33 Segment 1: Enlisting Men Against Sexual Assault

 

Synopsis: Colleges are now required by Federal law to present anti-sexual assault training to new students, but rather than instilling “no means no,” some experts think we need to do much more to enlist men to help prevent sexual assault. Experts discuss how it can be done by making men allies, rather than regarding them as potential perpetrators, and through bystander training.

Host: Reed Pence. Guests: Dr. John Foubert, Professor of Higher Education and Student Affairs, Oklahoma State University, National President, One in Four, and author of 7 books on preventing sexual assault; Ashley Warner, psychoanalyst and author, The Year After: A Memoir; Dorothy Edwards, Exec. Director, Green Dot, Etc.

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Click here for the transcript