Medical Notes 17-29

 

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook!

Subscribe and review on iTunes!

Medical Notes 17-27

 

Share this:

Medical Notes 17-26

 

Share this:

Medical Notes 17-24

rhjlogo

 

Medical Notes this week…

Foodmakers have removed trans fats from many of their recipes, and they’ll be banned in many foods nationwide in about a year. It’s a policy that could save plenty of lives, according to a study of counties that have already banned trans fats. The study in the journal JAMA Cardiology looked at 11 counties in New York State where trans fats have been banned in restaurants. Researchers found that heart attacks dropped by nearly 8% and strokes by more than 3%, compared to counties that didn’t restrict trans fats.

Diagnosing lung cancer in the future could be as easy as making a quick swab of the nose. A study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute shows that in people with lung cancer, cells as far away as the inside of the nose are genetically altered. People without cancer don’t have those alterations. Researchers have found 30 genes they could use as biomarkers for lung cancer. The test needs more work before it could be available as a screening test.

And finally, if you’re dieting, the tone of your Tweets give away whether you’ll lose weight. Researchers presenting to a conference of the Association for Computing Machinery say they were able to predict dieting success with 77% accuracy just by reading the dieter’s tweets. People who succeed are more upbeat and focused on the future. Those who fail send tweets that are more anxious.

And that’s Medical Notes this week.

Medical Notes 17-22

rhjlogo

 

Medical Notes this week…

A lot of people take low-dose aspirin for heart health but a new study shows it may also protect women against breast cancer. The study in the journal Breast Cancer Research shows that a regular dose of baby aspirin cuts breast cancer overall by 16% and reduces “hormone-receptor positive, HER2 negative” breast cancers by 20%. Those are the most common form of breast cancer. Higher aspirin doses taken less often were not protective, nor were other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen.

Vitamin D is known as “the sunshine vitamin” because the skin produces it when exposed to the sun. But a new study shows that sunscreen is getting in the way of vitamin D. The study in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association shows that sunscreen has contributed to nearly a million cases of vitamin D deficiency around the world. Scientists suggest that people should spend between five and thirty minutes twice a week out in the midday sun before they put on sunscreen.

And finally, extra testosterone makes men go with their gut, and they’re often wrong. A study in the journal Psychological Science shows that men who’d been given a dose of testosterone gel performed 20% worse than a control group on brain teasers where a person’s initial guess is usually wrong. Researchers believe the testosterone produced overconfidence so they never thought twice about their answers.

And that’s Medical Notes this week.

Medical Notes 17-21

rhjlogo

 

Medical Notes this week…

Going gluten-free is very popular, but a new study finds that if you don’t have celiac disease, there’s no point in it. In fact, it may even hurt you. The 25-year study in the journal BMJ shows that people who eat the lowest levels of gluten have a 15% higher risk of heart disease. Researchers say the results aren’t necessarily cause-and-effect, but when people restrict heart-healthy whole grains to reduce gluten exposure, they often end up eating more refined grains.

Kidney transplants in children are helping them survive longer. A study in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons shows that 96% of children who got a new kidney about 10 years ago are still alive today. The transplanted kidneys themselves are also surviving longer—78 percent of living donor kidneys are still functioning 10 years later, compared to less than half a few decades ago. Better immunosuppression drugs get much of the credit.

And finally, if you’ve heard fewer kids complaining about being bullied lately, there’s a reason. Researchers have documented a significant decline in school bullying over the last 10 years. An ongoing study in the journal Pediatrics asks students about their experience with bullying over the last month. Since 2005, the proportion of children saying they’d been bullied has dropped about two percent per year to below 10 percent. Fewer than half of students also say they’ve witnessed bullying in the most recent survey. In 2005, about two-thirds of kids said they’d witnessed it.

And that’s Medical Notes this week.