Medical Notes 18-10

 

Medical Notes this week…

Antibiotic resistance has left some serious infections with only one defense and the development of new antibiotics has slowed to a crawl, but a study in the journal Nature Microbiology reveals that scientists have found an entire new family of antibiotics in soil.  Researchers say the new antibiotics kill a variety of bacteria, including MRSA, that are mostly resistant to current antibiotics.  However its likely to take years before the find can be turned into an effective treatment.

We’ve reported on sibling abuse in the past and now a study in the journal Psychological Medicine shows that it can lead to mental illness later.  Researchers say people who were bullied by a brother or sister are up to three times more likely than other children to develop schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or other psychotic disorders by age 18. Kids who are also bullied at school are four times more likely to develop mental illness.

And finally, babies crawling on the floor, especially on carpeting, kick up a lot of bacteria, dirt, pollen, and other biological bits and they breath a lot of that in.  In fact, a new study in the journal Environmental Science and Technology shows that crawling babies inhale four times what an adult would when they walk across the same floor.  But scientists say its not necessarily a bad thing, exposure to allergens and microbes in infancy helps babies develop immunity and may reduce the chances they develop asthma and allergies later on.  

And that’s Medical Notes this week.

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17-29 Segment 1: Sibling Abuse

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Have you ever fought with a sibling? Most of us have at some point, especially as kids. While some experts say sibling rivalry strengthens sibling relationships, others claim this can be harmful for a child’s well-being. In extreme cases, siblings torment their brothers or sisters to the point of psychological or physical abuse. This abuse can lead to psychological disorders throughout a child’s life.

 

Thirty to fifty percent of siblings face abuse in their lifetime. What line can parents determine which is plain sibling rivalry and which is actual abuse? PTSD trainer Nancy Kilgore suffered through fifteen years of severe emotional, physical, and sexual abuse from her own sister. She wrote the book Girl in the Water about her abuse and the psychological effects on her life. Kilgore says parents must not dismiss that it is normal for siblings to torment each other, and suggests parents step in should they see an issue arise.

 

Valparaiso University’s assistant Professor of Psychology Dr. Mandy Morrill-Richards claims that parental attention is a key factor in sibling abuse. Typically, sibling abuse occurs out of the watch of parents, usually when they leave the children home alone. Often times the oldest child takes care of their siblings, and begins to abuse their younger siblings due to the lack of supervision. While parents cannot keep watch over their children 24/7, these experts suggest tackling the problem before it becomes even larger or more harmful for the children. This involves weekly open communication like meetings and paying attention to any warning signs. In order to prevent self-doubt, guilt, shame, and possibly even PTSD, parents need to supervise their children, especially if they begin to harm one another.

Read the entire transcript here. 

Guests:

  • Dr. John Caffaro, Distinguished Professor, Alliant International University
  • Nancy Kilgore, PTSD trainer, abuse survivor and author, Girl in the Water
  • Dr. Mandy Morrill-Richards, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Valparaiso University

Links for more information:

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Coming Up On Radio Heath Journal Show 17-29

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Sibling Abuse:

Psychological or physical abuse by siblings is much more common than most people realize. It can leave severe psychological scars. However, parents often downplay it, calling it “normal sibling rivalry.” Experts discuss the extent of the problem, warning signs of abuse, and how parents can act without involving family services officials and endangering the family.

Teeth and the Struggle for Oral Equality:

We often judge people by their smiles. However, dental care and medical care have always been separate in the US, creating a large population that doesn’t receive dental care. These people often end up with extremely poor oral health and make up a surprisingly large proportion of ER visits. Experts discuss.

15-23 Segment 1: Sibling Abuse

 

Synopsis: Psychological or physical abuse by siblings is much more common than most people realize. It can leave severe psychological scars. However, parents often downplay it, calling it “normal sibling rivalry.” Experts discuss the extent of the problem, warning signs of abuse, and how parents can act without involving family services officials and endangering the family.

Host: Reed Pence. Guests: Dr. John Caffaro, Distinguished Professor, California School of Professional Psychology; Nancy Kilgore, PTSD trainer, abuse survivor and author, Girl in the Water; Dr. Mandy Morrill, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Valparaiso University.

Links for more information:

Click here for the transcript