“Electroshock Therapy:” Not What You See In The Movies

Electroconvulsive therapy still has a stigma, with the reputation of being a painful, disturbing procedure that wipes out memories and, if movies are to be believed, even creates zombies. Experts explain the reality—that ECT is a quiet procedure that provokes a short brain seizure, releasing huge amounts of neurotransmitters to reset the brain in what is the quickest and most dependable treatment for severe and often suicidal depression.

Medical Notes: Week of June 7, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of June 7, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of June 7, 2020 including: Researchers are working on an app with a sensor to test for COVID-19 using only a drop of saliva. Then, life was more stressful than it was 25 years ago… and for middle aged people, it’s much more stressful. Plus, A study shows that emergency room visits for children for mental health disorders has increased 60 percent of the last 10 years. And finally, a study shows that homeschooled adolescents have significantly lower abdominal strength and endurance than public school kids even though their BMI’s were the same.

Medical Notes: Week of May 31, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of May 31, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of May 31, 2020 including: A newly developed smartphone app is remarkably effective at predicting if a person is infected with COVID-19. Then biomarkers for A-L-S or Lou Gehrig’s disease can be found in a person’s teeth in the first decade of life. Then, a study shows that changing the way physical therapy is done can improve strength by an additional 30 percent. And finally, The labels on drinks for kids don’t help adults figure out which ones are real fruit juice and which are sugary, artificially flavored imitations.

Music And Medicine

Music And Medicine

Pre-medical students have typically majored in science, but some medical schools are finding that liberal arts and even music majors with no science background can do well. Some admissions officers and doctors believe they may even have advantages, given the importance of communications in the doctor-patient relationship. A musician-turned-med student, an admissions officer and a musical doctor explain.

Genetic Testing and Family Secrets

The availability of consumer DNA tests and databases has allowed long-hidden family secrets to be revealed, including mistaken paternity and unknown siblings. It has also taken the anonymity away from some cases of sperm donation. Two experts discuss the ethics of overturning this promised secrecy and the impact that the revelation of secrets can have on entire families.

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of September 8, 2019.

Medical Notes: Week of September 8, 2019

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of September 8, 2019.

Medical Notes: Week of August 4, 2019

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of August 4, 2019.

The Pros and Cons of Mobile Health Apps

Mobile health apps are becoming very popular, though some are being shown to have little benefit. Few barriers exist to almost anyone entering the field whether they have health expertise or not. Privacy is also a concern. Experts discuss how people can protect themselves and find apps that do what they want.

Medical Notes: Week of July 21, 2019

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of July 21, 2019.

Can IUDs and Other Contraceptives Trigger Autoimmune Disease?

Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus carry a genetic predisposition, but need an environmental trigger to take hold. Triggers are poorly understood, but some women claim their disease is a result of contraceptives, including birth control pills and IUD’s. Experts and one women suffering from autoimmune disease discuss the issue.

Preeclampsia and a New Test for It

Preeclampsia, an irregularity in the placenta during pregnancy, is the leading cause of premature delivery worldwide, and causes nearly 20 percent of maternal deaths in the US. Little is known about its cause and how it can be treated, but an inexpensive new test could help flag those suffering from it and lessen complications. The test’s inventor discusses it and the disorder.